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Dangers of Braid

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  • Dangers of Braid

    I had something of a disaster with braid this afternoon on the middle Towy. I was using 20lb Power Pro with a mono leader. The story is I hooked a salmon approx 7-8lbs spinning on a tail of a pool on the far bank. The fish was on a lightly set drag and all seemed fine until he dived down deep on the far side of the pool. The braid then snapped like cotton . What happened was that the near half of the pool was a lot shallower and so as the fish dived on the far bank into deeper water, the braided mainline inevitably touched the bottom.

    I was annoyed for two reasons. Firstly I don't like leaving a fish with a hook in his mouth (I've been snapped only once before in thirty years fishing on fly.) Secondly I've had some warnings with braid that I've ignored. I've noticed sea fishing that it's abrasion resistance is virtually zero. I've had 30lb braid snap just under the tension of a lure being retrieved when the line literally just came across a rock. Anyone who doubts this should try a few tests before they hook that fish of a lifetime! A fish of only a pound or so would have snapped me in the circumstances I've described. I have used braid with some success salmon and sea trout spinning over the last few years, as the zero stretch and the ability to cast light lures are a definite advantage at times. As I learned today though imo braid really is an accident waiting to happen on a lot of rivers. The slightest abrasion under tension and it will snap like cotton! I'm back to good old fashioned mono after today and I'd advise anyone else to think very carefully before you use any of the super braids for general sea trout and salmon spinning.

    Phil

  • #2
    I foolishly "invested" in braid some years ago. The idea of such a fine line with such strength appeared too good to miss. I loaded the line without trying even a basic check. Then I applied the "tug test". Give a 20lb line a sharp tug, the sort a fighting fish is likely to impose, and the line will snap quite easily. I removed all the braid and have never used it since: nor will I.

    Loosing the fish of a lifetime is no way to learn teh shortcomings of any line. Beware and always try the "tug test"
    Highplains

    www.cpwf.co.uk

    Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise that we cannot eat money (Cree Indian saying)

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    • #3
      I'm surprised you found that Highplains. All the brands in 20 - 30lbs I've tried in the last few years, would easily pass a tug test - perhaps they've improved in this regard. In fact as long as you used braid friendly knots they would be virtually impossible to snap with your hands, without doing serious damage. It's specifically the lack of abrasion resistance that I have a problem with.

      Phil

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      • #4
        Originally posted by highplains View Post
        I foolishly "invested" in braid some years ago. The idea of such a fine line with such strength appeared too good to miss. I loaded the line without trying even a basic check. Then I applied the "tug test". Give a 20lb line a sharp tug, the sort a fighting fish is likely to impose, and the line will snap quite easily. I removed all the braid and have never used it since: nor will I.

        Loosing the fish of a lifetime is no way to learn teh shortcomings of any line. Beware and always try the "tug test"
        Were you aware at the time that knots that work with mono don't always work with braid highplains?

        Never ever had any issues using 14lb braid spinning for bass - never had a braid knot snap on my hand or by a fish. (Cue set trout braid knot snap story tomorrow)

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        • #5
          I dont use braid before the midddle of May,,,but dont use anything else after the middle of May but braid(power pro),,dont use less than 44lb which may seem eccesive but with no stretch etc it can break on sudden impact so a heavier strain deals with this better imo and coupled with a lighter leader its a ideal set up..also the lighter strains have a thinner diametre than can soon cut thru even the best fuji rings(i change at least to of my rods tip rings each season)always found it ok in snaggy water and belive me i fish some snaggy waters,,,,for me if you hit a snag with mono you weaken the line by a great deal and even if it doesnt break then it has a chance of breaking later in the fight as a fish lunges or speeds off etc,,,but on smaller rivers braid can be a disaster with no stretch in close quarter combat fishing conditions and fresh fish with soft mouths loses can be greater,,,,its horses for courses and sometimes we need to think if we're getting any benifit from the product or just going on what the masses say,,,but for me mono on a small river with a softer rod is a ideal setup,but on a medium sized river using a stiffer rod coupled with mono will give nearly the same benits as braid but on bigger rivers its braid for me...

          stump...
          Last edited by stump; 19-07-2011, 09:28 PM.
          CHASING THE SILVER TOURIST

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          • #6
            Used braid when it first came out years ago and for sure it has its problems. Never found a problem with a straight pull test but it does suffer from sever abrasion problems. Used on a rocky river with rocky gutters and ledge's such as the upper Wye its just asking for trouble. A taut braided line touching a rocky ledge or shelf then its curtains. Also any fragile hook holds are likely, due to its no stretch properties, to pull out especially if using a stiff rod.

            Having said that the 30lb braid I first used for salmon has landed tope to 35lbs on a 2lb test curve carp rod off Criccieth. If you want to feel something really run and pull I can recommend it, makes a salmon feel like a pussycat.!

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            • #7
              Used 44 lbs power pro for the last 2 years on my fixed spool reel without any problems. Catches during period include, amongst others, a 20 lbs pike and 2 x 16 lbs salmon. Even when stuck on the bottom I have never had the braid break. However I always add a 10ft section of 20 lbs maxima (using a 25 turn albright knot as recommended by power pro manufacturers, and a touch of fishing glue) before adding in a swival, any weights and a normal 2 to 3 foot spinning trace. This knot slides freely through the rings when casting.

              As others have said the right knots with braid are vital as otherwise it could break well below its stated strenght due to strangulation.

              One final point always keep a glove in your pocket when using braid to protect your hand when freeing it from the bottom.

              Richard

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              • #8
                I too have had some sudden breaks with 20lb Power-pro.mostly my fault.When worming I used to pinch my shot directly on the line,some of the edges of the shot are quite sharp too,thus weekening the line.Now I either thread on some very soft rubber tubeing and pinch the shot to that, to the line or have yet to try what carp anglers use.Tungston putty,which could also help lower the chances of snagging up.Also I was advised to use the Polomar knot on braid.Now if I get snagged up and give a sharp tug,I usually get my gear back,but with a straight hook.
                I have tried nylon for worming and it just does not feed out so smooth as braid,and coils up round the rod eyes too,if useing minimum wieght.I have tried both long and short memory line,in the end I went back to braid,but being very aware of its short comings

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                • #9
                  I've used Cortland master braid for the last five years, no probs at all, I use 32lb for salmon, and 20 or so for seatrout. Its a purpose made spinning braid, it will stand considerable resistance to abrasions more so than mono in my experience. In summary I think its very much dependent on the type of braid. I've used dyneema braids like spiderwire and found them very poor for spinning- I used for pike dead baiting and found them OK. Horses for courses and all that. But I would not hesitate to recommend the Cortland master braid.

                  As for knots I pass the braid through the swivel twice (I use a fulling mill floro carbon leader of 12 or 15 lb, to the spinner or worming hook) and then use a grinner/uni knot to tie off.

                  Andy R
                  Last edited by Andy R; 25-06-2012, 10:34 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Airart, do you not use a monofilament leader with braid ????, your asking for trouble pinching shot on to it mate. But glad you realised what was happening..
                    I've bin using Power-Pro for an few years now, with a little thought i've had very few problems... Yes Braid will cut easily when under stress, but so will mono ??? I hear guys saying it cuts their rod rings.. With lined rings i've had less problems than with a fly line ??
                    Si.....

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                    • #11
                      Hi Ya Silverinvicta.
                      I am still useing power-pro braid,in fact I have just reversed it back on to my spool,so I can get longer use out of it.It means finding a long field,tie the end to a fence post and walk out to empty spool,then I walk back,re tie and wind it on.I can not think of any other way of doing it.
                      I have not had any more problems with it since useing a polomor knot and rig tube to wrap the lead around it.
                      I have tried useing a mono leader,but find that the knot interfears with casting and me rod is too short to use a swivel,so I set the drag looser and hold the spool on the strike.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by airart View Post
                        Hi Ya Silverinvicta.
                        I am still useing power-pro braid,in fact I have just reversed it back on to my spool,so I can get longer use out of it.It means finding a long field,tie the end to a fence post and walk out to empty spool,then I walk back,re tie and wind it on.I can not think of any other way of doing it.
                        I have not had any more problems with it since useing a polomor knot and rig tube to wrap the lead around it.
                        I have tried useing a mono leader,but find that the knot interfears with casting and me rod is too short to use a swivel,so I set the drag looser and hold the spool on the strike.
                        Hi Airart,
                        if you have a problem with the knot catching in the rings leave the ends of the knot mono at least an inch and a half long, that way the knot is streamlined as it passes through the rings.. I've been using that little tip for years and i never have a problem, i've also been using this knot with braid for joining my leader to the braid for years now.. again, never had a prob.. BUT give each knot at least 5 turns before wetting and carefully tightening...(Its neater than the Palomar) and i find it easier to tye...
                        http://www.google.com/imgres?q=fishi...,r:3,s:0,i:137

                        Best of luck
                        Si....

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